The Importance of Time Value

Time Value is a concept Japanese Futurist Yoneji Masuda developed.

“The development of information productivity through computer communications technology has given rise to a new concept of TIME-VALUE to replace material values” “Time is an intangible, abstract concept, by which we mean the measurement of the passage of time…”

“But if conceived of as a person’s lifetime, time used fo the satisfaction of wants, time itself creates value” (Masuda, 71 [The Information Society as Post Industrial Society]).

A blog visitor commented that time-value could better be defined as ‘now-value’ in today’s terms. Value is realized relative to other constructions of value. Each time you are doing anything, especially using the Internet, ask yourself, “is what I am doing an optimum use of my now-value?”

I used to use a program called 8aweek to track my time usage on programs like flickr, digg, and facebook. Eventually, I realized that a better use of my now-value would be to write, and that anything I wrote might be better than simply wading rather unconstructively through photos.

A recent article on unhealthy bloggers shows the sped up now-value of being able to post, but this now-value forces the blogger to work on Internet time instead of his own. Now-value and time-value on the net is different because all time is flowing at once, in all time zones. Twenty four instances of 5 Pm at the same time is twenty four times more 5 o’clocks than can be accessed in real-life time.

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The Power of Historical Analogy

Theories can be used to glean an understanding of overall societal trends. This is why it is important to study history.

Laws conserve themselves, trends conserve themselves. The only thing that changes is the way in which things manifest from time to time.
Historical Analogy: Societal foreseeing approach based on historical hypothesis; the past developmental pattern of human society can be used as a historical analogical model for future society (Yoneji Masuda, The Information Society as Post Industrial Society (1980), 160).

Social Networks in Physical Products

The modular, semantic, “lego-like” shape of Web 3.0 is beginning to manifest.

The Olinda is a music device that has the user’s personal social networks embedded in it’s body, allowing user’s to listen to their friends radio stations.

It’s clunky, prototypical, and unevolved, but it’s also kind of cute…like Lego bricks. And isn’t it more enjoyable to be able to build things than simply use them?

Regardless of where it goes or how many it sells, the Olinda is a harbinger of the Web 3.0 that is to come.

AboutUs.org – A Wiki Business/People/Idea Directory

A lot of user frustration is caused by unreliable information experiences. Contact and location information is often ill-placed or absent on business websites. Because of this, the user spends an unnecessary amount of time wayfinding instead of contacting the business. This leads to user frustration and business losses, not to mention time lost on the side of the user.

Enter AboutUs.org. It’s like Wikipedia/Phone Book/Search Engine/Social Networking – all in one. It provides a consistent and cheery user experience, while data mining the needed contact and location information that a user needs…quickly and quietly.

Plus, users can augment every page of the site to expand information about a business or topic, because AboutUs is a Wiki. Users can have profiles, interests and groups. They can find others based on their interests/edits. They can upload photos and stories about themselves in Wiki format.

AboutUs.org is based in Portland, too! In fact, I recently visited their location and was terribly impressed by their corporate environment. Being there gave me renewed ambitions for what Japanense futurist Mr. Masuda wrote about in his book about the future: The Information Society as Post Industrial Society.

AboutUs looks like it could be another step towards a bright future of coworking and cocreation of knowledge and ideas.

Meeting Ward Cunningham

Tonight, my friends Heather and Max and I went to the WikiWednesday Open House event at Portland’s AboutUs.org. We met Wiki Inventor Ward Cunningham.

The event consisted of a networking session followed by a conference in critical thinking led by Ward. We discussed the current manifestation of Wikipedia, the future of the Wiki, and it’s limitations. The notes I took there will form the basis of a new series of posts and a few papers.

After the conference, Ward talked about AOL, the endless September of the Internet. Before the net was open to the masses, college students used to have to deal with the new waves of college students that were just learning to use the Internet every September. After a month or so, the Freshmen would learn how to use the Internet correctly and everyone would continue to improve the system as a whole.

Then AOL arrived on the scene. The September never ended. Not everyone ever figured out how to use the web like the generations of college students before them. Thus, AOL became termed as the “endless September”.

Using associated networks of experts for question answering.

Linkedin.com example:

Facebook.com Example:
If you build up networks of experts, you can ask them questions.